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Summer’s Here! How to Keep Pets Cool

by | Jul 10, 2020 | Anxiety, Blog, Cats, Discomfort, Dogs, Pet Health Tips, Stress

Warmer temperatures mean more time outside. That goes for our pets, too! Like us, pets can become overheated or take in too much sun. Unfortunately, heat exhaustion (hyperthermia) happens far too often. It occurs when a pet’s body temperature rises and they cannot regulate their body heat. In mild cases, applying ice to your pet’s neck or putting them into a cool bath can provide quick relief. Always follow up with a visit to the veterinarian. In severe cases, the result is heatstroke, which can cause your pet to lose consciousness or have organ failure. This is an emergency and requires immediate attention from a veterinarian.

Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion include:

  • Excessive panting
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Dehydration (gums may appear blue, gray, purple or bright red)
  • Fever
  • Low urine output
  • Accelerated pulse
  • Tremors
  • Dizziness
  • Weakness
  • Vomiting

Prevention is key. Here are some things to do and not to do:

DO Take Walks With Your Pet Early In The Morning And Around Sunset

In addition to the direct heat on your pet, the sun drastically heats up sidewalks and roads. Paws were meant for walking on grass and soil, not concrete and asphalt. Paw pads can easily burn, causing a great deal of discomfort.

Tip: Prevent burns to the skin with a full cover body suit or  sunscreen made especially for dogs. Unfortunately, there aren’t any deemed safe for cats. To prevent burned feet, consider booties or a salve designed to protect paws (and noses, too!). Soothe sunburned skin or burned paws by generously applying Treatibles Topical Cream (great for bug bites, too!).

DO Make the Yard Summer Ready

Summers are made for outdoor living. Your pets enjoy it as much as you do! Just keep in mind that it doesn’t take long for heat to start affecting dogs and cats. It is important to provide bowls of fresh, cold water, as well plenty of shady spots for them to lounge.

Tip: Cool pet pads can offer up to four hours of comfortable relief. Keep one in the shade for a great way to cool a pet as they rest.

DO Minimize Sun Exposure Inside

Glass is a conductor of heat. When the sun is shining and your pet is snoozing in a sun puddle, they can easily become overheated. In addition to offering shade by adjusting blinds, shades and curtains, be sure to create space in the room that is shielded from the window.

Tip: Make sure the room is well ventilated and that your pet has access to cold water.

DO NOT Shave Your Pet

Your pet’s fur is their ventilation system. It works with airflow to not only keep them from overheating, it also protects them from sunburn. The only reason to ever shave a medium or long haired pet is if the fur is matted and is pulling on the skin.

Tip: Keep your fur baby’s coat clean by combing or brushing every day. This rids the fur of dirt and debris that can interfere with cooling them down. It also goes a long way in preventing matting.

DO NOT Keep Pets In The Garage

Unless your garage is properly air conditioned, it is no place to leave your pet for long periods, especially during the day. A garage can heat up quickly and create an oven like setting.

Tip: If you must confine a dog or cat, pick a room in the house that is air conditioned and not in the direct path of the sun. Be sure to provide cold water and shaded areas. Offering Treatibles chews or oil can help keep them calm and chill while you’re gone.

DO NOT Leave Pets In Cars

Hundreds of pets, especially dogs, die or suffer irreversible damage from being left inside cars on hot days. Car windows absorb the sun’s rays and insulate the vehicle. On a 75 degree day, it takes only ten minutes for a car to reach 100 degrees. Here’s how quickly a car heats up in various temperatures:

75 to 100 in 10 minutes

75 to 120 in 30 minutes

80 to 110 in 10 minutes

85 to   90 in 5 minutes

85 to 100 in 10 minutes

85 to 120 in 30 minutes

Cracking the window has little effect. Even leaving the air conditioner on is not fool proof. A pet confined to the rear of the car in direct sunlight can still experience heat stroke. Far too many well-meaning pet parents have found this out in the most excruciating way.

This is why 28 states have enacted laws prohibiting leaving pets in cars.

Tip: If you see a pet alone inside a hot, parked car, call the police. Some states will allow you to break a window in order to save a pet’s life. They include Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Massachusetts, New York, Ohio, Tennessee, Vermont, and Wisconsin.

Make this summer the best, safest, happiest ever for your pet! Happy pets make happy humans. That’s why we always strive to provide

Harmony for the Whole Family®

Summer’s Here! How to Keep Pets Cool

by | Jul 10, 2020 | Anxiety, Blog, Cats, Discomfort, Dogs, Pet Health Tips, Stress

Warmer temperatures mean more time outside. That goes for our pets, too! Like us, pets can become overheated or take in too much sun. Unfortunately, heat exhaustion (hyperthermia) happens far too often. It occurs when a pet’s body temperature rises and they cannot regulate their body heat. In mild cases, applying ice to your pet’s neck or putting them into a cool bath can provide quick relief. Always follow up with a visit to the veterinarian. In severe cases, the result is heatstroke, which can cause your pet to lose consciousness or have organ failure. This is an emergency and requires immediate attention from a veterinarian.

Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion include:

  • Excessive panting
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Dehydration (gums may appear blue, gray, purple or bright red)
  • Fever
  • Low urine output
  • Accelerated pulse
  • Tremors
  • Dizziness
  • Weakness
  • Vomiting

Prevention is key. Here are some things to do and not to do:

DO Take Walks With Your Pet Early In The Morning And Around Sunset

In addition to the direct heat on your pet, the sun drastically heats up sidewalks and roads. Paws were meant for walking on grass and soil, not concrete and asphalt. Paw pads can easily burn, causing a great deal of discomfort.

Tip: Prevent burns to the skin with a full cover body suit or  sunscreen made especially for dogs. Unfortunately, there aren’t any deemed safe for cats. To prevent burned feet, consider booties or a salve designed to protect paws (and noses, too!). Soothe sunburned skin or burned paws by generously applying Treatibles Topical Cream (great for bug bites, too!).

DO Make the Yard Summer Ready

Summers are made for outdoor living. Your pets enjoy it as much as you do! Just keep in mind that it doesn’t take long for heat to start affecting dogs and cats. It is important to provide bowls of fresh, cold water, as well plenty of shady spots for them to lounge.

Tip: Cool pet pads can offer up to four hours of comfortable relief. Keep one in the shade for a great way to cool a pet as they rest.

DO Minimize Sun Exposure Inside

Glass is a conductor of heat. When the sun is shining and your pet is snoozing in a sun puddle, they can easily become overheated. In addition to offering shade by adjusting blinds, shades and curtains, be sure to create space in the room that is shielded from the window.

Tip: Make sure the room is well ventilated and that your pet has access to cold water.

DO NOT Shave Your Pet

Your pet’s fur is their ventilation system. It works with airflow to not only keep them from overheating, it also protects them from sunburn. The only reason to ever shave a medium or long haired pet is if the fur is matted and is pulling on the skin.

Tip: Keep your fur baby’s coat clean by combing or brushing every day. This rids the fur of dirt and debris that can interfere with cooling them down. It also goes a long way in preventing matting.

DO NOT Keep Pets In The Garage

Unless your garage is properly air conditioned, it is no place to leave your pet for long periods, especially during the day. A garage can heat up quickly and create an oven like setting.

Tip: If you must confine a dog or cat, pick a room in the house that is air conditioned and not in the direct path of the sun. Be sure to provide cold water and shaded areas. Offering Treatibles chews or oil can help keep them calm and chill while you’re gone.

DO NOT Leave Pets In Cars

Hundreds of pets, especially dogs, die or suffer irreversible damage from being left inside cars on hot days. Car windows absorb the sun’s rays and insulate the vehicle. On a 75 degree day, it takes only ten minutes for a car to reach 100 degrees. Here’s how quickly a car heats up in various temperatures:

75 to 100 in 10 minutes

75 to 120 in 30 minutes

80 to 110 in 10 minutes

85 to   90 in 5 minutes

85 to 100 in 10 minutes

85 to 120 in 30 minutes

Cracking the window has little effect. Even leaving the air conditioner on is not fool proof. A pet confined to the rear of the car in direct sunlight can still experience heat stroke. Far too many well-meaning pet parents have found this out in the most excruciating way.

This is why 28 states have enacted laws prohibiting leaving pets in cars.

Tip: If you see a pet alone inside a hot, parked car, call the police. Some states will allow you to break a window in order to save a pet’s life. They include Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Massachusetts, New York, Ohio, Tennessee, Vermont, and Wisconsin.

Make this summer the best, safest, happiest ever for your pet! Happy pets make happy humans. That’s why we always strive to provide

Harmony for the Whole Family®

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