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Can Hot Spots Be Caused By Food Allergies?

by | Jan 6, 2020

More than an itchy annoyance for your pet, a Hot Spot –  also referred to as superficial pyoderma – is a serious issue that results in lesions on the skin. This is due to inflammation and a secondary bacterial or fungal infection caused by chronic scratching, licking and biting.

If you notice that each time your dog or cat eats a specific protein or type of kibble they become itchy and obsessively scratch causing a Hot Spot to develop, there is a good chance a food allergy or intolerance is the culprit. Food allergies can also cause ear and foot infections.

The two most common protein allergies for dogs are chicken and beef. For cats, chicken and fish. Pets can also have an intolerance to ingredients such as soy, corn, wheat and other grains.

Elimination diets are often suggested to determine which foods are causing the allergic reaction. While this is an effective method, it is also very time consuming.

Another option is to order a Nutrtiscan allergy test. This requires only a swab of your pet’s saliva. The foods tested include common pet food ingredients like beef, corn, duck, lentils, wheat, soy, cow’s milk, lamb, venison, chicken, turkey, white fish, egg, barley, millet, rice, oatmeal, salmon, rabbit, quinoa, potato, peanut, pork and sweet potato.

It is heartbreaking when a beloved pet is suffering from a Hot Spot. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to offer relief and help the skin heal.

Shave the area around the lesions/irritated skin

This is important because hair can get stuck in the wound and make it even more difficult to treat.

Disinfect the affected area

Povidone iodine is often recommended as a disinfectant because it effectively remove bacteria. According to Dr. Karen Becker, D.V.M., it is best to dilute with purified water until the liquid is the color of iced tea. Then apply it to the wound with a washcloth or gauze. For the first couple of days, you may need to do this every two to three hours.

Use a topical (would like to add a link to our topical cream here – too risky?) to relieve the itch and pain

Manuka honey, colloidal silver and aloe are all good choices. Halo’s Cloud Nine Herbal Ear Wash can also offer relief. As a bonus, it is gentle, antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral and can be used anywhere on the body.

During the healing process, an e-collar may be needed to stop your pet from licking or scratching the affected area.

If the Hot Spot persists, please see your veterinarian. New approaches to healing wounds, including ozone therapy and laser therapy are excellent non-pharmaceutical options.

Hot Spots can be a pet and pet parent’s worst nightmare. Knowing how to address the root cause and resolve the issue can help slow or stop the infection, heal the skin, and save your sweet pup or kitty from days, weeks or months of discomfort.

Can Hot Spots Be Caused By Food Allergies?

by | Jan 6, 2020

More than an itchy annoyance for your pet, a Hot Spot –  also referred to as superficial pyoderma – is a serious issue that results in lesions on the skin. This is due to inflammation and a secondary bacterial or fungal infection caused by chronic scratching, licking and biting.

If you notice that each time your dog or cat eats a specific protein or type of kibble they become itchy and obsessively scratch causing a Hot Spot to develop, there is a good chance a food allergy or intolerance is the culprit. Food allergies can also cause ear and foot infections.

The two most common protein allergies for dogs are chicken and beef. For cats, chicken and fish. Pets can also have an intolerance to ingredients such as soy, corn, wheat and other grains.

Elimination diets are often suggested to determine which foods are causing the allergic reaction. While this is an effective method, it is also very time consuming.

Another option is to order a Nutrtiscan allergy test. This requires only a swab of your pet’s saliva. The foods tested include common pet food ingredients like beef, corn, duck, lentils, wheat, soy, cow’s milk, lamb, venison, chicken, turkey, white fish, egg, barley, millet, rice, oatmeal, salmon, rabbit, quinoa, potato, peanut, pork and sweet potato.

It is heartbreaking when a beloved pet is suffering from a Hot Spot. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to offer relief and help the skin heal.

Shave the area around the lesions/irritated skin

This is important because hair can get stuck in the wound and make it even more difficult to treat.

Disinfect the affected area

Povidone iodine is often recommended as a disinfectant because it effectively remove bacteria. According to Dr. Karen Becker, D.V.M., it is best to dilute with purified water until the liquid is the color of iced tea. Then apply it to the wound with a washcloth or gauze. For the first couple of days, you may need to do this every two to three hours.

Use a topical (would like to add a link to our topical cream here – too risky?) to relieve the itch and pain

Manuka honey, colloidal silver and aloe are all good choices. Halo’s Cloud Nine Herbal Ear Wash can also offer relief. As a bonus, it is gentle, antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral and can be used anywhere on the body.

During the healing process, an e-collar may be needed to stop your pet from licking or scratching the affected area.

If the Hot Spot persists, please see your veterinarian. New approaches to healing wounds, including ozone therapy and laser therapy are excellent non-pharmaceutical options.

Hot Spots can be a pet and pet parent’s worst nightmare. Knowing how to address the root cause and resolve the issue can help slow or stop the infection, heal the skin, and save your sweet pup or kitty from days, weeks or months of discomfort.

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